The Sandstorm Rages...

Questions?   An online collection of posts from an art supply store employee! To be honest, most of my time on tumblr is spent browsing other peoples' posts. But I'll definitely offer up the occasional post of my own art, Artist Protips, and the odd reblog.

Thanks for stopping by!
norcumi:

ladiesplusjunk:

that’s how you make armor for women, no bullshit boob cups.

Just beautiful.

This is the most glorious thing I’ve ever seen. Stunning and divine.

norcumi:

ladiesplusjunk:

that’s how you make armor for women, no bullshit boob cups.

Just beautiful.

This is the most glorious thing I’ve ever seen. Stunning and divine.

(Source: crazybitcharoundhere, via cubone)

— 2 days ago with 89898 notes
#More of this please  #All the time  #Nothing but this  #Perfection  #Not Artist Protips 

kyletwebster:

Prepare to flip out, digital art friends …
Coming this week: Real Variegated Wash brushes for Photoshop. No joke. Please reblog, so other people can freak out.

KYLEBRUSH.com

This Kyle guy is working his ass off to fill the world with more and more amazing traditional medium homage photoshop brushes and I am loving every moment of it. :B

This one seems immensely cool, seems like it’ll offer up a great way to get more organic and lush color gradients in your digital work. Lots of visual interest, and a lot of freedom as far as how evenly and quickly colors fade from one to another.

— 4 days ago with 1360 notes
#Not Artist Protips  #But still totally relevant!  #Kind of like a Digital Artist Protip  #Kyle brushes  #Rad 

Sir Anthony Hopkins is magical. I can’t stop listening to this. It is phenomenally beautiful.

— 1 week ago
#Videos  #Not Artist Protips 
paperwaspnest:

Finally, the GIF is finished! This is the last you’ll see of my Sonic short for a while. I don’t want to give away what it’s about :)For anyone just joining me - the goal of this was to make them look like they just jumped out of their early 1990’s Sonic 2 box art.Feel like putting your browser to the ultimate test? Here’s the same scene as a 1920x1080 Animated GIF.

So 90’s! I’m digging all the airbrushy gradients, I know a lot of time went into each frame. :)

paperwaspnest:

Finally, the GIF is finished! This is the last you’ll see of my Sonic short for a while. I don’t want to give away what it’s about :)

For anyone just joining me - the goal of this was to make them look like they just jumped out of their early 1990’s Sonic 2 box art.

Feel like putting your browser to the ultimate test? Here’s the same scene as a 1920x1080 Animated GIF.

So 90’s! I’m digging all the airbrushy gradients, I know a lot of time went into each frame. :)

— 1 week ago with 18 notes
#sonic the hedgehog  #90's sonic  #fat sonic  #the only good sonic  #I liked him better before he lost all the weight  #tails  #my husband made this!  #Not Artist Protips  #Bill Cass art 
"Have you ever heard the phrase cockblocking? You know, you’re at a bar, talking to a girl, and what happens? Her less attractive friend comes over and ruins everything. Cockblock. Well I have to tell you something guys: I have been the less attractive friend, and you were NOT cockblocked. I was following orders from my better-looking friend that she did not wanna fuck you. …Girls have two signals for their friends: ‘I’m gonna fuck him’ and ‘HELP.’"

Amy Schumer [x] (via rashaka)

The number of “get me out of here” tactics women have developed and shared to help each other escape from overly-insistent-to-borderline-predatory dudes in public places should probably be enough evidence of the existence of rape culture all on its own.

(via madgastronomer)

YES

(via ellakrystina)

I especially like how, in the majority of cases, you don’t have to verbally communicate what your signals are to other women. I’ve had women I didn’t even know come save me. Literally every woman recognizes the “Dear god, help me” facial expression, and knows exactly what they should do. We don’t get a handbook for this. We don’t have a sit-down nail polish party where we talk about a standardized woman code for preventing creepers. It’s just part of being a woman.

BUT LOL RAPE CULTURE DOESN’T EXIST.

(via eastberlin)

Yup. I’ve definitely taken strangers by the arm and pulled her aside to go, “Oh my GOD it’s you! How ARE YOU?!? It’s been so long!” and then been like “hey I could overhear that guy who wouldn’t leave you alone so I figured I’d give you an out” and then see their VISIBLY RELIEVED expressions. This is part of girl code, because rape culture is that pervasive.

(via thebicker)

I once had a girl sit on my lap and say “hey baby” after she witnessed a guy (who was easily 20+ years older than me) hitting on me and harassing me for my number even after I told him I was taken. After he got up and left she asked if I was okay. I couldn’t thank her enough times, I even bought her a drink.

(via castielsmiles)

We have done this. In fact, we are this. Because we are asexual and we don’t like alcohol so we never drink, we have gone with friends to parties/places where our sole job was to keep an eye out for everyone and be the permanent ‘aggressive man-sheild.’ Not one of our female friends has ever questioned this or found it all strange. In fact, often once they realized we were willing to do it, it would be pre-arranged. Every guy friend we ever did this in front of or tried to explain to looked flabbergasted. They had no idea that this was a) an intentional thing, b) a planned ahead thing, or c) universal.

Rape culture is the fact that every woman understands this. Male privilege is the fact that no guy on earth seems to know or understand.

(via cractasticdispatches)

I’ve been asked to pretend to be my friend’s girlfriend every time we go out at night, just because she wears clothes that show off her curves and guys won’t leave her alone. They only back off when I put my arm around her and act as if we’re together romantically, and sometimes not even then.

(via zaataronpita)

i once ran interference for a friend, only to receive the unwanted advances myself. he wouldn’t back off until my (male) friend literally wrapped me up in his arms and acted as if he was my S.O.

(via miljathefailcat)

It happens online too. A guy I know started Facebook-stalking me after a recent interaction, and my roommate immediately got on Facebook and told him she was my girlfriend. He thankfully backed off after that.

I can’t count the number of times I have pretended to be somebody’s girlfriend or sister in a bar when a guy wouldn’t leave her alone. Both with friends and strangers.

(via feministsupernatural)

After reading these, I feel like taking a shower. Because I’m the designated driver pretty much every time, not being a big fan of alcohol, but I rarely, if ever, intervene. And yeah, I’m small and pretty physically weak, but I could put my foot down verbally if it came down to it. I’m just too scared.

(via harperhug)

You’re probably scared of confronting the guys.  And you should be.  That’s what this whole post is about.  Rape culture is so prevalent and socially accepted as the rule of the land that if someone confronts a guy and tells him directly to back off, someone is getting hurt.  That’s why all of the testimonies here are examples of how to deflect.  How women all learn methods of pulling a woman away from a situation with a guy who isn’t allowing her to say no, by making up some lie that will get the guy to let her go without sending him into a rage and deciding to teach you both a lesson about knowing your place and submitting to rape culture.  Men are dangerous in these situations because all of society backs them up as just a nice guy who deserves a chance, and vilifies any woman who refuses to give him a chance.  Women are not allowed to say no.  So other women have to rescue the women saying no and pull them away with some made up excuse.  Otherwise the situation will escalate and the ones who get hurt are always the women. 

(via coffeegleek)

Women absolutely have to learn rescue tactics for each other, but it’s kind of funny how we describe really obvious facial expressions and body language as “secret signals.” The reality is that women telegraph disinterest in these aggressive men, making it super obvious, but men choose to ignore it. Total strangers who are just sitting nearby or happen to glance their way will be able to see that the woman isn’t interested, but the guy making the advances is somehow oblivious? Unlikely.

(via smitethepatriarchy)

I remember Samantha and the rest of our group doing this. I’m immensely thankful for the fact that they were such quick thinkers, it saved me on more than one occasion.

(via fishnbacon)

— 1 week ago with 157578 notes
#Not Artist Protips  #people suck 
paperwaspnest:

cameronpluswhitney:

AMAZING first day of ECCC!!!! I’m not going to lie, I was/am very under prepared because I was not expecting so many wonderful people to like my work! I sold about half of my stuff and I ran out of business cards on just the first day! I read everyone’s comments on here as well and I love you all!!!! Thank you for sending good vibes my way for my first con!!!!! #eccc (at Emerald City Comic-Con)

We bought the small sword-in-forest and cloudy night scene framed pieces from Cameron at ECCC on Friday and his work honestly stole the show for both Tasia and myself.
You work is so great, Cameron! You earned your great first day. I hope the collection of Adventure Time props sells. Its fantastic as well.

I agree, Cameron. Your successful first con day was entirely well-earned. Your work is absolutely stunning. I hope that today and Sunday are both equally successful.
This guy makes MIND-BLOWING papercrafts. I have a lot of respect for people who have the kind of patience for cut paper art, because I know how involved they can get, but even the time and love I put into my papercraft entomology pieces pales compared to Cameron’s attention to minute details. He puts a ton of time into selecting perfect shades and colors of paper for each piece, and his cuts are so precise and gorgeous. And he frames them in really nice, classic, simple frames. As Bill mentioned, we bought two of his pieces, but I’m still completely smitten with that Adventure Time piece. If I had $500 to drop on it, I would have happily bought it right then and there. His prices are more than reasonable for the ridiculous detail he puts into his work, it is phenomenal.

paperwaspnest:

cameronpluswhitney:

AMAZING first day of ECCC!!!! I’m not going to lie, I was/am very under prepared because I was not expecting so many wonderful people to like my work! I sold about half of my stuff and I ran out of business cards on just the first day! I read everyone’s comments on here as well and I love you all!!!! Thank you for sending good vibes my way for my first con!!!!! #eccc (at Emerald City Comic-Con)

We bought the small sword-in-forest and cloudy night scene framed pieces from Cameron at ECCC on Friday and his work honestly stole the show for both Tasia and myself.

You work is so great, Cameron! You earned your great first day. I hope the collection of Adventure Time props sells. Its fantastic as well.

I agree, Cameron. Your successful first con day was entirely well-earned. Your work is absolutely stunning. I hope that today and Sunday are both equally successful.

This guy makes MIND-BLOWING papercrafts. I have a lot of respect for people who have the kind of patience for cut paper art, because I know how involved they can get, but even the time and love I put into my papercraft entomology pieces pales compared to Cameron’s attention to minute details. He puts a ton of time into selecting perfect shades and colors of paper for each piece, and his cuts are so precise and gorgeous. And he frames them in really nice, classic, simple frames. As Bill mentioned, we bought two of his pieces, but I’m still completely smitten with that Adventure Time piece. If I had $500 to drop on it, I would have happily bought it right then and there. His prices are more than reasonable for the ridiculous detail he puts into his work, it is phenomenal.

— 3 weeks ago with 38 notes
#5 stars  #ten out of ten  #would recommend  #AMAZING art  #papercraft  #papercut  #ECCC 2014  #Not Artist Protips  #seriously though  #I want that Adventure Time piece  #So bad 
"

When I was seventeen and preparing to leave for university, my mother’s only brother saw fit to give me some advice.
“Just don’t be an idiot, kid,” he told me, “and don’t ever forget that boys and girls can never just be friends.”
I laughed and answered, “I’m not too worried. And I don’t really think all guys are like that.”

When I was eighteen and the third annual advent of the common cold was rolling through residence like a pestilent fog, a friend texted me asking if there was anything he could do to help.
I told him that if he could bring me up some vitamin water that would be great, if it wasn’t too much trouble.
That semester I learned that human skin cells replace themselves every three to five weeks. I hoped that in a month, maybe I’d stop feeling the echoes of his touch; maybe my new skin would feel cleaner.
It didn’t. But I stood by what I said. Not all guys are like that.

When I was nineteen and my roommate decided the only way to celebrate the end of midterms was to get wasted at a club, I humoured her.
Four drinks, countless leers and five hands up my skirt later, I informed her I was ready to leave.
“I get why you’re upset,” she told me on the walk home, “but you have to tolerate that sort of thing if you want to have any fun. And really, not all guys are like that.”

(Age nineteen also saw me propositioned for casual sex by no fewer than three different male friends, and while I still believe that guys and girls can indeed be just friends, I was beginning to see my uncle’s point.)

When I was twenty and a stranger that started chatting to me in my usual cafe asked if he could walk with me (since we were going the same way and all), I accepted.
Before we’d even made it three blocks he was pulling me into an alleyway and trying to put his hands up my shirt. “You were staring,” he laughed when I asked what the fuck he was doing (I wasn’t), “I’m just taking pity.”
But not all guys are like that.

I am twenty one and a few days ago a friend and I were walking down the street. A car drove by with the windows down, and a young man stuck his head out and whistled as they passed. I ignored it, carrying on with the conversation.
My friend did not. “Did you know those people?” He asked.
“Not at all,” I answered.
Later when we sat down to eat he got this thoughtful look on his face. When I asked what was wrong he said, “You know not all guys do that kind of thing, right? We’re not all like that.”
As if he were imparting some great profound truth I’d never realized before. My entire life has been turned around, because now I’ve been enlightened: not all guys are like that.

No. Not all guys are. But enough are. Enough that I am uncomfortable when a man sits next to me on the bus. Enough that I will cross to the other side of the street if I see a pack of guys coming my way. Enough that even fleeting eye contact with a male stranger makes my insides crawl with unease. Enough that I cannot feel safe alone in a room with some of my male friends, even ones I’ve known for years. Enough that when I go out past dark for chips or milk or toilet paper, I carry a knife, I wear a coat that obscures my figure, I mimic a man’s gait. Enough that three years later I keep the story of that day to myself, when the only thing that saved me from being raped was a right hook to the jaw and a threat to scream in a crowded dorm, because I know what the response will be.

I live my life with the everburning anxiety that someone is going to put their hands on me regardless of my feelings on the matter, and I’m not going to be able to stop them. I live with the knowledge that statistically one in three women have experienced a sexual assault, but even a number like that can’t be trusted when we are harassed into silence. I live with the learned instinct, the ingrained compulsion to keep my mouth shut to jeers and catcalls, to swallow my anger at lewd suggestions and crude gestures, to put up my walls against insults and threats. I live in an environment that necessitates armouring myself against it just to get through a day peacefully, and I now view that as normal. I have adapted to extreme circumstances and am told to treat it as baseline. I carry this fear close to my heart, rooted into my bones, and I do so to keep myself unharmed.

So you can tell me that not all guys are like that, and you’d even be right, but that isn’t the issue anymore. My problem is not that I’m unaware of the fact that some guys are perfectly civil, decent, kind—my problem is simply this:

In a world where this cynical overcaution is the only thing that ensures my safety, I’m no longer willing to take the risk.

"

r.d. (via vonmoire)

This is an immensely important read. It so accurately articulates the situation that far too many people have experienced. It is disgusting and deeply upsetting, and it needs to change.

(Source: elferinge, via erikamoen)

— 1 month ago with 116093 notes
#Not Artist Protips  #people suck 
hobbies

When a gifset manages to catch my interest, after I’ve registered and stored away what is actually being said, I like to watch and rewatch it to read the person’s lips. Match up each syllable. I’m fascinated somehow, not only by the sheer muscle movements of someone’s lips, but also by their character, their being, expressing what they believe to be truths.

It’s fairly discomforting to me when people post gifs in which the text says one thing, but the mouths are saying another.

— 1 month ago with 1 note
#I'm pretty weird  #But it is a very satisfying feeling  #the little things  #seriously though match up your damn quotes  #Not Artist Protips 

circuit-city:

whenever i have those brutal searing being-dissolved-from-inside period cramps during school or work i pretend i am a viking warlord who has been stabbed in the abdomen but i killed the assailant so i’m the only one who knows im injured and i have to carry on normally til the end of the battle to keep up my mens morale

lol magnificent

(via monster-princelet)

— 5 months ago with 153389 notes
#Not Artist Protips 
A Note on Artist Protips

There’s number 2! … A month and a half later… I know, I know. I didn’t say they’d be updated consistently. XP But I do plan on doing more of them. I’ve been particular busy with family and personal things, but I do have several more subjects to cover that I’d like to try and get out there in the world.

When writing this entry in particular, I noticed a great influx of “generally”s, “usually”s, “often”s, and such. The fact is, there are a ton of brushes out there in the world, and while I have gained an exponential amount of knowledge via working in an art supply store, I still don’t know everything. I never will. That’s just how knowledge works, you can’t know EVERYTHING. Even if I considered myself an expert, there always seems to be some exception to some rule hiding somewhere. The entire series of these art supply tips are going to be somewhat limited simply due to what I do and don’t know about different mediums. There will be some variance and deviation from rules, occasionally. I’m learning and I’m hoping that I can help other people to do so, as well. So, just know that these aren’t the only rules, and that I’ll be the first to admit that there will be some exceptions.

And, on a related note, if anyone is ever looking for more nuggets of art supply information, art suppliers are great resources. In particular, Blick’s facebook page is chock full of gems. (You can read more information about the Kolinsky fiasco that is happening in the U.S. on Blick’s facebook post from July 26, 2013.)

— 6 months ago with 1 note
#Artist Protip  #art supplies  #art supply reviews  #how to  #we'll just see how long this lasts...  #chalk full  #a note about kolinsky brushes 
Artist Protip # 2

Protip: Brush sizes, like pant sizes, are not universal.

This is true for brushes made for any of your basic mediums - oil paints, acrylic paints, watercolors. Probably others as well, but I’m specifically talking about fine artists’ brushes. And, obviously, if you have several brushes that are 1 inch brushes, I should certainly hope that those ARE the same - but I’m talking the numeric sizing scale here. Brushes sizes like 000 (also known as 3/0), or 8, or 24.

Most brushes that I’ve seen are part of a line of brushes - that is, several brushes made to be part of a series of brushes. Once in a while I’ll come across one that is just kind of… that one brush, but usually it’ll be part of a line. Many lines of brushes will offer several shape categories - round, filbert, flat, bright, angle, fan, script - to name a few. And within each of those categories, you’ll usually find several sizes.

Generally, watercolor brushes tend to get smaller than others (but still offer a great range of big brushes for your wash needs). In addition, watercolor brushes tend to have shorter handles than those intended for acrylics or oils. This is because most acrylic and oil painters, traditionally, work larger and more gestural (usually painting while standing up, for instance), than watercolorists.

Brushes within a line can vary immensely in size - size 0’s and even some several sizes smaller than that up to sizes that top off around 24. Pick up a handful of 8’s from different lines of brushes and they probably won’t all be the same. Some won’t even be close. But, at the very least, number sizes do all go in the same direction from line to line - the smaller numbers are for smaller brushes, and the bigger numbers are for bigger ones. Many lines of brushes come in even sizes, so if a supply list calls for a size 7 round it may be harder to find than a size 6 or 8. Frequently the biggest brushes will skip even further, e.g. jumping from 12 to 16, or 20 to 24.

These numbers aren’t standardized across brands or lines. That being said, a general size 8 round is a great place to start for a watercolor brush. (I can’t speak for the others, as I’m not particularly well-versed in other painting mediums (someday!)… although, I’ve heard good things about filberts. :B I may delve into brush shapes another day. As well as brush material.*)

Here are some basic rules to get you by when searching for or caring for a brush:
You want a brush that will hold a fine point when it is wet (even damp is a great sign). If your brush has bed-head when it’s bone-dry it shouldn’t matter, as long as it comes to a fine edge or point when wet or loaded with paint.
Frequently brushes come with a little see-through plastic tube covering the bristles. This exists as a precaution to keep the hairs of the brush in good condition while in transport. Once you take the tube off to use the brush, I recommend just tossing the little tube - as tempting as it is to keep it so you can put the little hat back on the brush once you are done painting, there is a high likelihood of creasing hairs and ruining the brush if the tube gets put back on. Hot water can sometimes aid in returning disobedient hairs back into place, but it doesn’t always work.
Do not leave your brush sitting in water. Your brush will not appreciate it. And you will not appreciate having to buy a new brush.
Don’t leave your brush sitting with the bristles up when wet, as the water will be more likely to climb further into the ferrule (the metal part crimped around the brushes). Lay it down flat if it is still damp or, if possible, hang it bristle-down so that gravity can help to expel any water still in the hairs.

~~

*I’ll focus on brush materials another time perhaps, but it is worth noting now that the U.S. is having trouble getting Kolinsky sable hair brushes in. For one reason or another, it isn’t happening, and it isn’t looking good. I highly recommend that if you’ve ever considered upgrading to a natural hair brush over a synthetic, or if there is a particular Kolinsky that you’ve had your eye on for a while, save up and buy it now. No U.S. retailers are getting any new stock in on them, so once they sell out of the stock that they have, there is a possibility that they’ll never have them again.

— 6 months ago with 2 notes
#Artist Protip  #art supplies  #art supply reviews  #how to  #brushes  #paintbrushes  #paint brushes  #brush size  #don't leave your paint brush sitting in water  #a note about kolinsky brushes  #kolinsky 
Artist Protip # 1

Protip: Colored Pencils, as a medium, do not inherently break.

The majority of people I’ve come across start their venture into the world of colored pencils with Prismacolor’s Premier Soft Core line. Prismacolor is a well-established brand, offering a well-known name for people to latch on to, and many people go with what sounds familiar or what is the most popular option.

When choosing colored pencils, consider the following:

Prismacolor colored pencils are wax-based. This in and of itself is not bad. Just be aware that wax pencils do at times achieve an effect called “wax bloom.” This is what happens when layering the pencils - after a while the ability to layer sort of plateaus and one can no longer put any more color down.

Prismacolor colored pencils have very frail cores. Have you recently pulled out a brand new pencil, only to find that every time your sharpen it, the tip of the core pops out and requires immediate resharpening? This can sometimes be aided by getting a more gentle pencil sharpener, but what happens when the pencil rolls off your desk and falls to the floor? An immediate transition to slow motion, a dolly zoom emphasizing the horror on your face as the pencil careens to it’s untimely death? The pristine wood exterior belies the shattered core. It mocks you. “Happy birthday, Timmy. Have some pencils that you want so badly to love but can NEVER ACTUALLY USE.”

The last point is only truly driven home by the fact that Prismacolor pencils are essentially spot welded into the wood - glued in a few choice spots throughout the pencil to hold the core in place. This offers little support for the core. Sometimes the entire core can come loose and, without breaking at all, just slide out of the wood entirely.

Does this mean you should go throw out all of your Prismacolor pencils? No. That would be tragic and wasteful.

Does this mean that Prismacolor is totally weak? Not at all. They are still a fine option, many instructors and professionals swear by them.

But, what I do recommend is to try out other options. Many art supply stores carry colored pencils from multiple brands, and offer individual stock as well as sets. This can allow you to purchase only a few pencils at a time, in colors of your choosing, so you can see what else is out there. Use your Prismacolors. Love them. For as long as they love you back. And then, when the time comes to replace a color or get a new 12 set, just try another brand. You might just come to realize that using colored pencils totally doesn’t have to go hand in hand with complete frustration. 

Other good brands include (but are not limited to!):

 Tombow’s Irojiten line - these are also wax-based, but have a very luxurious creamy feel when used. Also, their packaging is classy. Which has nothing to do with the quality of the pencils but is still worth noting, cause DAMN, that’s classy.

 Faber-Castell’s Polychromos line - these are an oil-based colored pencil. Lots of colors to choose from, and they are glued throughout the full-length of the pencil.

You may also notice that both of these options come pre-sharpened, which is a good indicator of how confident they are in their pencils not breaking in transport.

And, if you still end up loving Prismacolor best at the end of the day, there’s no reason you can’t go back. :)

— 7 months ago with 11 notes
#Artist Protip  #art supplies  #art supply reviews  #how to  #prismacolor  #colored pencil  #fabercastell  #tombow  #Hitchcock zoom  #noooooooooo 
Commence Artist Protips!

So, working in an art supply store for the past two years have got my mind all abuzz with… art stuff. Somehow I’ve managed to get by pretty much entirely without any motivation to actually do any art myself recently due to any number of things going on in my life…

But, I’m still pretty passionate about art things, I still find excitement in my experiences with art things, and I’ve learned a ton from my coworkers, our customers, playing around first-hand with products, vendor presentations, product demos, and all sorts of sources.

I’m no expert by any stretch, but I like an art supply that won’t back sass me when I try to use it. So, I’m gonna try something new. I’m gonna try posting some stuff that I’ve learned on here. And maybe it’ll help some people out. Maybe it won’t. That is entirely up to you, reader! :)

— 7 months ago with 1 note
#Artist Protip  #art supplies  #art supply reviews  #how to  #we'll just see how long this lasts...